It’s Okay to Not Be Okay: Korean Drama Review – Episode 1 – 6

It’s Okay to Not Be Okay is a 2020 NETFLIX original production that stars Kim Soo Hyun and Seo Ye Ji as leads. img_9631_originalIt tells the story of a community health worker at a psychiatric ward who lives on 1.8 million won ($1,520) a month while caring for his autistic brother and a storybook writer suffering from an antisocial personality disorder. A man who denies love and a woman who doesn’t know love defy fate and fall in love while finding their souls and identities in the process (Source – MyDramaList). All episodes of this drama are available on NETFLIX.

Expectations: This is one of the dramas that I had on my list way back from 2019 when the title was still Psycho, But I’m Okay. At that time, only Kim Soo Hyun was the confirmed cast. I wanted to watch it mainly because of him and the storyline. Once Seo Ye Ji came on board, I was even more thrilled because she is such a great actress. Right from the premiere, I dived into the first six episodes before taking a break to let it wrap up.

(warning – spoilers ahead)

Review:

The animated intro for episode one gave me spooky, but serene vibes. The animation style is similar to Tim Burton’s animated film – Corpse Bride, and it gave It’s Okay to Not Be Okay a good stand out from other Korean dramas. The second factor that piqued my interest was the intricate filming style. I noticed that they were filming from windows and glass reflections instead of taking direct shots on the actors. I truly fell in love with the editing and visual representations in this drama. Take, for example, in episode one how they showcased Mr. Lee’s string of texts to Gang-Tae in video format. It made the scene way more hilarious to me. I could rave on about the beautiful cinematography of this show because they brought serious A+++++++ game in that department.

Moving on to the plot, I can tell that this is going to be a touching and heartfelt series. I love that within all the intensity, we still get some vibrant comedic scenes. Due to the common mental health theme, I am getting ‘It’s Okay, That’s Love’ vibes. I hope the writer gives us a befitting happy ending🤞🏼.  So far, all the actors are doing a fantastic job, and this includes the young counterparts and cameo actors. Also, our beautiful leads are showcasing great chemistry.

I love how each episode fuses in Ko Mun-Yeong’s storybooks, and the lessons from each chapter are remarkably profound

  1. The Boy Who Fed on Nightmares “So don’t forget any of it, Remember it all and overcome it. If you don’t overcome it, you’ll always be a kid whose soul never grows.” I can attest that some bad encounters have to be faced head-on before the pain can completely go away. After all, if life stays smooth all the time, how can we learn and grow? However, I still advise everyone to choose their battles carefully.
  2. Zombie Kid Raising a child doesn’t only require providing their basic necessities like food, clothing or shelter. Being emotionally present is equally important. Shower your children with love because, in the end, that’s what stays with them forever. I cried when they read out this storybook. Not because it relates to my own personal experience but out of empathy towards children that don’t have anyone showing them real love.

Now let’s look into a few characters that stood out to me throughout these six episodes.

Seo Ye Ji as Ko Mun-yeong 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Can we just talk about Seo Ye-Ji’s beautiful shallow voice? I love her deep tone. Also, every outfit for Ko Mun-Yeong is a statement. She looks gorgeous in every scene. Mun-Yeong is wild, and she slightly reminds me of Jang Man-wol from Hotel del Luna. I adore her fierce and straightforward personality. Though, I believe she’s unstable and quite manipulative. Mun-Yeong acts all tough, but she is scared. Basically, everyone in this drama has their demons, but Mun-Yeong handles hers well and hardly cares what others have to say. I can’t wait for the show to reveal more about her parents. Her mother was definitely the chief psycho of the family, or why else did she restrict and isolate younger Mun-Yeong that much. At least now that Sang-tae and Gang-tae are living with her, Mun-Yeong will get a better feeling of what family means. Here are some of my favourite moments from this character –

Kim Soo Hyun as Moon Gang-Taeimg_9571_originalIt’s sad that Moon Gang-Tae was born as a backup to care for his autistic brother 24/7. He can’t express real emotions because Sang-Tae reads his facial expression. Gang-Tae has to smile and pretend to be happy or satisfied all the time. How could their mom place such responsibility on a little child? At least now, Mun-Yeong is present to question his cowardly and pretentious lifestyle. Usually, I find the childhood connections to be unnecessary, but I like how it’s playing out in this drama. The writer introduced it from the first episode with substantial purpose, and now it doesn’t feel like a cliche used to connect the main leads.

Oh Jung Se as Moon Sang-Taeimg_9569_originalHe is a phenomenal actor. Major kudos to him for playing an autistic character flawlessly👏👏👏👏👏👏.  Sang-Tae is a very loving and pure person. He stole my heart when he told Gang-Tae about saving money to buy a van. That way, they wouldn’t have to search for a new house all the time. I am intrigued to discover what the butterflies signify for him. I think it has a connection to their mother’s death and might have something to do with Ko Mun-Yeong. I hope the hospital director helps him face his fears.

Park Kyu Young as Nam Ju ri img_9576_originalI still don’t know how to feel about Nam Ju-ri. Aside from the fact that she also likes Gang-Tae, she just seems off and weird to me. Hopefully, as the story progresses, I might come to appreciate her role more. Honestly, I need to see some backstory that explains her personal issues with Mun-Yeong. All the same, her crying scene in episode five was quite cute and funny to me.


Overall, I am enjoying the current pace and story progression. I already know this will be an iconic drama that I can always return to. Plus, the OSTs are beautiful. Luckily for me, I can find the soundtrack album on Spotify since the series has finished airing. My favourites right now are “Hallelujah” by Kim Feel –

“In Your Time” by LEE SUHYUN –

& “In Silence” by Janet Suhh –

If you’ve started or already completed this drama, what are your thoughts on it?

My Pictorial|Poster Faves: #ClassyLadies – Saturday RollCall

As already mentioned earlier this week, I am sharing pictures of celebrities that naturally have an air of elegance and poise. From the way they carry themselves to how they speak and dress, they continuously keep things classy. This is my last roll call.

(Please Note: none of these images are mine. I got them from official magazine websites and social media sites.)

My first lady on this list is Seo Ye Ji. These are recent shots from her new management – Gold Medalist Agency and NETFLIX for her new drama –

img_8521

Fashion_The King_01

Up next is Sun Yi on the cover of CHC Magazine – June 2020 Issue –

img_6833

 

The third lady on my list is Zhang Yuxi on the cover of Beijing Walker – June 2020 Issue –

img_8110

 

Next is Cecilia Liu on the cover of COSMOPOLITAN China – July 2020 Issue –

img_8192img_8194

img_8191

 

To round up, I have DAVICHI’s Kang Min Kyung for 1st Look Magazine –

img_8285

 

KINGDOM Season 2: Korean Drama Review

Kingdom is a 2019 Netflix Original Series based on a manhwa called Kingdom Of The Gods by YLAB. After some research, I discovered that there are actually three individuals involved in the creation of the original source material. The idea for the story came from Kim Eun-hee, and she is also the screenwriter for the Netflix adaptation. The illustrator for the manhwa is Yang Kyung-il, and the actual author is Youn In-wan. I know most people might not care for all this information, but I still wanted to provide it. img_3719_originalSynopsis: Kingdom is set in the Joseon period of Korea. It focuses on a zombie plague that has spread mysteriously around the country’s southern provinces. Crown Prince Lee Chang is labelled a traitor by the Haewon Cho clan, which is the family of the current Queen. Due to the political plot against him, he embarks upon a mission to investigate and end the spread of the mysterious undead plague.

Being that I have already seen the first season, which ended with a cliffhanger, I was super excited about watching this continuation. Kingdom promises action and thrill, so I definitely held high hopes for it. If you will like to read my review for season one, use this link 👉🏼 KINGDOM: Drama Review

(Warning –  slight spoilers ahead)

Review:

I watched this drama on Saturday while washing my hair and I must say that it was such a beautiful time for me. As a lady with naturally kinky hair, wash-day can be a bit tiring. However, it felt easy this time around because I genuinely enjoyed every minute of this drama.

Okay, first of all, I will like to applaud the intro for this series. It’s very intricate and oddly captivating. As a whole, the cinematography and editing for this drama were perfectly executed. The opening sequence they did for episode three truly solidified the beauty of this production for me – 

Another notable mention is the beautiful and haunting background scores that complimented each scene so well. Overall the production on season two of Kingdom gets an A+++ from me. I enjoyed the build-up, pacing, story and character development of this season way more than the previous one. Even the fight scenes were perfectly choreographed. I got hyped about each new episode. I also love how they wrapped up and connected the storylines of the main characters. I was able to get more understanding of each person’s actions.

We left off season one with a swam of zombies ready to attack in broad daylight. Right off the bat, it was already intense. I was pumped and ready to see how they would survive the gruesome encounter. Thankfully a good number of them survived, and the story gave some insight into the origin of the plague. Now while I was watching season one, I had my suspicions about a few characters. The first one was the crown prince’s bodyguard – Moon Young, and the other was his teacher – Ahn Hyun. Although I was proven right, their betrayal and mistakes still made me sad because it was not merely a black and white situation. The characters finally showed the depth and complexity that was lacking in the first season. Sure they made mistakes, but eventually, they tried to atone for their wrongs. This is why I stated above that I was able to get a better understanding of each person’s actions. I love that this time around, I could feel the friendship, loyalty and bond between the characters. I actually cried a few times.

Moving on, I have to compliment the actors for such an engaging performance. Every single person brought their best to this production. Even the villains with their very disturbing moral grounds showcased chilling and believable acting. There were a few moments when some people’s actions were annoying. A prime example being the State Minister’s nephew – Jo Bum Pal. His lack of backbone and silence in wrong situations irked my soul, but because I saw slight growth in every episode, I was okay with him. This is why I can conclude that no character felt lacklustre to me. The leading roles made smart and brave decisions that genuinely impressed me. A big round of applause should be awarded to Joo Ji Hoon, who portrayed Crown Prince Lee Chang👏👏👏👏. He did a great job of leading this series. I felt every ounce of his words and actions. One of my top scenes from him was in episode six when they had to fight off zombies in the palace. I think I enjoyed that moment way more than I was supposed to. Here’s the scene – 

I really appreciate the realistic portrayal of the final fight in the palace. They actually showed people getting bitten. Honestly, it would have been a loophole if they all came out untouched after dealing with such a massive number of zombies at once.

Going back to the villains, which are the Queen and her father – Jo Hak Joo. Their actions proved that greed only leads to unfavourable outcomes, and they also confirmed that decisions shouldn’t be based on the greater good or evil just to achieve fast results. Their final moments were monstrous and quite disturbing to me. They gained nothing in the end🤦🏼‍♀️🤦🏼‍♀️🤦🏼‍♀️. Absolutely nothing, but since I don’t want to over spoil, I’m going to end my train of thoughts on their case here. All I can say is that brutality reigned in that family.

Now, after all this praise, here lies the questionable part for me. Why does Netflix need to extend this show? I feel with the way things ended, it could have been a reasonable wrap-up. I don’t even mind the premise that they haven’t found a concrete cure for the plague, because that would leave the next season to focus more on the resurrection plant. However, the whole idea of Jun Ji Hyun’s character creating new zombies out of nowhere seems entirely off to me. I’m scared that they might mess up the proper flow of this series with too many seasons, but we’ll see.

My rating for Kingdom Season 2 is 10/10. I wouldn’t mind rewatching it again because I genuinely enjoyed the story. Plus, all the questions and concerns I had after season one were resolved with this continuation.

To get a better understanding of how I rate each movie or drama, click 👉🏼 Drama|Movie Rating Guide. All English subbed episodes of this series are available on NETFLIX.

If you’ve seen this series, what are your thoughts on the story???

 

Triad Princess: Taiwanese Drama Review

Triad Princess is a 2019 NETFLIX Original Taiwanese drama that stars Jasper Liu and Eugenie Liu as leads. It has six episodes. 8d86bc69-37da-4f3f-886e-303ab9620fb3-295-0000000113f2cd1fSynopsis: Growing up in the shadows of her triad boss father, Angie Ni craves an independent life of her own. Angie decides to defy her father’s wishes and runs away from home. She takes on a gig as an undercover bodyguard for a famous actress. She must learn to navigate the unfamiliar world of glitz, glamour, and even love.

Expectations: I’ve had this drama on my watch list for a while now, and since I haven’t been feeling motivated to do much, I decided to give it a go yesterday night. My main reason for seeing this series is Jasper Liu. Most of his dramas are great, so I had high hopes.

(warning – minor spoilers ahead)

Review:

Overall, Triad Princess was an okay show. The story progression wasn’t excellent, but it was fun to watch. This was a six episodes series; hence everything happened fast. The main actors did their best with the script and time they had.

My favourite aspect of this series was the comedic action scenes. Eugenie did a great job portraying Angie Ni. She was believable as someone who grew up in a gang. On the other hand, Jasper Liu’s character Yi Hang felt flat. There wasn’t much depth to him; therefore, I couldn’t flow with his actions 100%.

There were at least three primary story arcs in this drama. If I am to rank them according to personal preference, I will choose the actress Ling Yun and her blackmailing ex-boyfriend as number one. It was nice to see a character that wasn’t perfect from the get-go. She made mistakes and tried her best to make something better of her life. From the look of things, I believe there’s going to be a season two, so I hope she finds her son and finally rids herself of the troublesome ex-boyfriend. Also, I appreciate her friendship with Angie. A great representation of female companies without any toxicity or betrayal.

My second-ranked arc is that of the main couple, Angie Ni and Yi Hang. They had chemistry, but their love story progressed too quickly. This is undoubtedly due to them having only six episodes. Some of this couple’s scenes were cheesy and corny, most especially the airport scene at the end. They also had a few misunderstandings here and there, but it looks like they got back together at the end of the series. I chose them as second because I see potential from both actors in making a tremendous onscreen couple. I only hope that the writer and director do a better job with the next season’s storytelling.

The last arc that I kind of cared for is that of the talent manager, Sophia Kwong. Her story with her ex-husband and their child was quite sad. However, I still found her a bit too controlling with her artists’ personal life. I get that it’s show biz, but she isn’t giving her artists enough freedom to be their authentic selves. Maybe that’s why Ling Yun couldn’t open up to her about her past.

Any other character or story arc in the drama did not matter much to me because they weren’t captivating enough. I found myself skipping a lot of scenes. Hence I can say that although I enjoyed watching Triad Princess, it lacked substance. It isn’t the best quality drama I have seen, but I wouldn’t mind watching the second season just for the story arcs I mentioned above.

My rating for Triad Princess is 6.5/10. To get a better understanding of how I rate each movie or drama, click 👉🏼 Drama|Movie Rating Guide. All six episodes of this series are available on NETFLIX.

If you have seen Triad Princess, what are your thoughts on the story???

Cast Of The King: Eternal Monarch For NETFLIX.

(Please Note: none of the images are mine. I got them from official websites and social media sites.)

Group pictures with Kim Go Eun, Lee Min Ho, Woo Do Hwan, Jung Eun Chae and Kim Kyung Nam. img_5063img_5064_originalimg_4902_original

 

Couple shots – Lee Min Ho and Kim Go Eunimg_5068img_5067img_5066

 

Bromance shots – Lee Min Ho and Woo Do Hwanimg_5069img_5070

 

Personal – Lee Min Hoimg_5074

img_5072

 

Personal – Woo Do Hwan img_5078img_5077

 

Here are a few bonus photos of our main leads:

First off is Lee Min Ho for Seven Luck Casino Advertisement

Up next is Kim Go Eun for ELLE Magazineimg_4909img_4914

img_4911

 

First Impressions of ‘The King: Eternal Monarch’ – Korean Drama Review

The King: Eternal Monarch is a 2020 NETFLIX original TV series that stars Lee Min Ho and Kim Go Eun as leads. This drama is from the star screenwriter Kim Eun Sook. A few of her other works include Secret Garden, The Heirs, Descendants of the Sun, Goblin, Mr. Sunshine, etc. In this post, I’ll be sharing my opinion on episodes one to four of this series.

Synopsis: Lee Gon is the emperor of Corea. His citizens regard him as the perfect ruler, but behind his impeccable appearance, he hides a deep wound. When he was eight, he witnessed his father’s murder and was nearly killed. One day, while chasing after a young lady, Lee Gon gets propelled into a parallel world and meets Lieutenant Jung Tae Eul. The duo would later team up to defeat criminals and close the door between both worlds.

Expectations: This is one of the dramas I was looking forward to watching this year. The screenwriter has created a reasonable number of excellent shows. Plus, the cast seemed promising, so my expectation is off the roof for this one.

(warning – spoilers ahead)

From what I have seen, The King: Eternal Monarch definitely has potential. The story progression so far is ideal. If they continue with this momentum, things will sail smoothly. It could even be better once they start intensifying the plot from episode five. That would take the story to another level and also entice more viewers. We’ve seen the foundation of the story, so now bring in the action. You all get what I mean???

Okay, now let’s dissect episodes one to four properly. Everyone’s acting has been standard, and the cinematography is absolutely beautiful. It’s like I’m watching a movie premiere. I always get this classic cinematic vibe from Kim Eun Sook’s works. I still remember Mr.Sunshine, which was such a phenomenal show from beginning to end. These two dramas have different vibes, but similar picture quality. That aside, I am also enjoying the few comedic scenes we got. The characters have great chemistry. Lee Min Ho and Woo Do Hwan as a duo give me life. Also, every outfit so far has been on point. Most notably, the king and his bodyguard, they always look regal. Plus, Woo Do Hwan is sexy to me no matter what he wears.😍😍😍img_5013Currently, I am not feeling Prime Minister Koo. She is too entitled and seems like a factor for future problems. Lieutenant Jung Tae Eul’s cop friend Gang Shin Jae is another character that I think might follow the villain path, but I’m hoping and praying that he proves me wrong. Also, Prince Buyeong is giving me sketchy vibes due to his unwillingness to tell Lee Gon the truth concerning the autopsy report.

The horse, Maximus, is such a beautiful specie. I think I am in love😂😂😂. He’s as white as snow and very majestic. Befitting for a king.img_5056

Based on what I’ve watched, there are a few questions that I want a resolution to as the series continues.

  1. At the beginning of episode one, Jung Tae Eul and Gang Shin Jae were interrogating Lee Gon’s uncle. I’m interested to know what point of the timeline that scene falls into.
  2. Also, why doesn’t the uncle age? Right now, I’m assuming that it’s because he continually crosses between both worlds. So he’s cheating time in a way, but I still need more clarification.
  3. Why does the king feel pain whenever the thunder strikes. Is it because he crossed into the other world, and if so, does his uncle experience the same? In episode four, it looks like some sort of energy bolt is growing on his back.img_5057
  4. How did Lieutenant Jung Tael Eun save the younger Lee Gon? Does this mean that there’s time travelling involved? We’ve seen the parallel worlds, but there’s been no mention of moving through different times. So I hope that will be explained later.
  5. Can actions in one world affect the parallel character in the other world? In episode four,  Yeong makes himself a hot cup of coffee and mistakenly spills it. At the same time, Eun Sub also spills his ice tea latte claiming that it’s too hot. They also had the same exact reaction. What’s going on here???? Am I reading too much into things?

Moving on to two of my favourite scenes, which all happen to include Woo Do Hwan.

  • Horse Rant with Eun Sub –This was such a chill but funny scene to me. From the way we Lee Gon’s face changes once he realizes that this isn’t his Yeong to how he falls into complete dismay after Eun Sub’s horse jokes. I was dying.😂😂😂
  • “I Can Hear You,” said the Captain –This lady completely mirrored my fangirl reaction to Woo Do Hwan as Yeong. He is too hot, and I wouldn’t mind if she ends up with him as a couple.

In conclusion, we’ve established that time stops when either Lee Gon or his uncle crosses over to a different world. Also, Lee Gon is suspicious about his uncle’s presumed death, and the traitor still has plans to usurp the throne with all his new followers. Things are looking good, so I hope that this drama doesn’t disappoint me.

That is all I have to say concerning The King: Eternal Monarch. What do you all think of this drama?

 

 

 

The Ghost Bride: Taiwanese Drama Review

The Ghost Bride is a 2020 Taiwanese drama. It has six episodes and is available on Netflix. 3f1e1cdd-2854-438b-8ade-dbe7d0b0aa4d-7900-000006431a2998faSynopsis: Set in 1890 Malacca, a young woman named Pan Li Lan, is forced to marry a dead man in exchange for help with her family’s poor finances. She makes a deal with Tian Ching, the ghost she’s meant to marry. In exchange for her father’s life, she will investigate his murder. As things unfold, Li Lan finds herself in a more complicated situation than she bargained for.

Expectations: This was on my list for must-watch dramas of 2020. I love spooky ghost stories. Also, the trailers and first posters looked quite promising. I am familiar with Chris Wu. Most of his series I have seen were really good, so why I decided to give this one a shot.

(warning – spoilers ahead)

Review: 

From the first poster I saw, I assumed that I was going to get a decent horror thrill and mystery, but the reality of what I got from The Ghost Bride was a lot of comedic scenes, some mystery and hardly any spookiness. Which isn’t bad, but definitely not what I expected.

The first thing that I noticed once I started episode one was the background scores. Yes, they were beautiful, but they sounded quite modern in comparison to the period the story was set in. Thankfully this got better. The next aspect I took note of was the picture quality. I absolutely love the cinematography for this drama. It was clear, simple and stunning.

This is my first time watching Huang Pei Jia. She did a great job as Pan Li Lan. The scenes with her and Er Lang were fun to watch. Chris Wu also gave an excellent performance as Er Lang. Even though I wasn’t expecting so much comedy, his character was a joy to watch. Overall most of the actors were okay, but there were still a few that gave mediocre performances.

After finishing the drama, I went ahead to read some reviews. I noticed that a few people believe that Tian Ching(the ghost) sincerely cared for Li Lan, but I beg to differ. He kept on tormenting her family members, and it was selfish of him to try and keep her in the Netherlands against her will. Even though he claimed that his upbringing was messed up, I don’t feel bad for him because he showed no sign of remorse. Plus, I blame the scriptwriter for my lack of empathy towards Tian Ching. There wasn’t enough shown that would enable me to sympathize with his character. What the drama showed me was a villain that needed to be dealt with.

Now, concerning Pan Li Lan’s affection towards Tian Bai. I didn’t care much for that pairing because there was no chemistry between them. The person she bonded with was Er Lang, the heavenly guard, and that was why her decision at the end made sense to me.

Altogether nothing really stood out to me in this drama; hence I don’t have much to say. It did showcase selfless love between family members, but overall it lacked a lot. Story-wise, The Ghost Bride did not depict excellent writing skills. The only thing that will make me want to watch a second season is the cliffhanger at the end. Aside from that, I don’t see myself rewatching this drama. My rating is 6.5/10. To get a better understanding of my rating, click 👉🏼 Drama|Movie Rating Guide

The Ghost Bride wasn’t to my taste, but someone else might actually love it. So if you need some lighthearted ghost story, then give it a chance and form your own opinion.

KINGDOM: Korean Drama Review

Finally, I have woken up from my long slumber. I am back with my review for the 2019 zombie-themed Korean series, Kingdom. I know that this is a late review, but I really wanted to take my time to do this properly.

kingdom-netflix[1]Kingdom is a 2019 Netflix Original Series set in the Joseon period.

Synopsis: The king has fallen ill, and rumours start to spread that he has actually died. Crown Prince Lee Chang is labelled a traitor by the Haewon Cho clan, which is the clan of the current Queen. Due to the political plot against him, he embarks upon a mission to investigate the spread of the mysterious undead plague that has beset the king and the country’s southern provinces.

Honestly, the main reason why I kept stalling on this drama was because of the zombie theme. I am not the biggest fan of the undead. So, going into this series, I expected some horrid scenes. I knew that I would be getting a well-written plot and delivery from start to finish. I hoped that since the series had only six episodes had to have been well planned out because of the short time provided to develop the story.

(Warning – spoilers ahead)

My review on this is going to be very short and precise. Because the drama only has six episodes and ended with a cliffhanger. So there is not much to conclude on for now. I need the second season to be released as soon as possible because they cannot just leave me hanging with such an epic plot twist.

With that said, I have one word for this drama, INTENSE. This was such an action-packed series. A big thumbs up to all the actors for the fantastic range they showed throughout this drama. Their acting was very believable, most notably from the zombies. From the way they ran to their reactions, every move was made to look as real as possible. Their acting really sold this story for me because I usually do not enjoy zombie movies, but I was glued to my screen throughout the six episodes.

I noticed immediately from the start that there was a shift from the usual Korean drama series style of storytelling. Typically with Korean dramas, the audience is provided with some sort of back story to better understand the characters, but this drama did not have much of that. So my initial reaction halfway through the series was that the characters lacked depth. This caused me to be unclear on why precisely the Crown prince decided to rebel against his father for the throne. I know that he had enemies and therefore needed to do anything within his power to survive, but I still want to know more about the relationship between him and the king. Even with that lack of depth, I have nothing against the writer for not providing a backstory for the characters. This is because, as I watched to the end of the series, I realized that the main focus was on the zombie epidemic itself and not necessarily the characters. So on that note, I concluded that this drama was not too concerned with character development and in-depth storylines. It had a definite plot, which was Zombie apocalypse, and it was well executed.

As already mentioned, I expected a good number of horrid scenes, and from the very first episode, I got it. Not even ten minutes into episode one and someone’s head was already on the floor. Now since we are discussing horrid scenes, let us look into how the epidemic began to spread in the first place. I get that the people were starving, and the need to stay alive can make anyone take drastic measures, but did Young Shin really have to cook a dead person as meat for sick people to eat. I was so grossed out by that. Did he not think about how unhealthy that will be. He started the entire zombie apocalypse. If he did not serve them that meat, they would not have been infected. I still want to know what his story is because, as of now, I am not his biggest fan. He might have helped keep people alive, but I just cannot seem to overlook the fact that he escalated the situation due to his rash decision.

That aside, I enjoyed the comedic scenes that we got to see in the first half of the series. Especially the bickering between Crown prince Lee Chang and his royal guard. But by the end of the series, I began to suspect his guard. I hope to be proven wrong in season two because if he is really a spy, it will be a big blow to the prince. In episode six, it was revealed that the Haewon Cho clan had planted a mole on the crown prince’s side, and the only person who had been with Lee Chang from the beginning was the guard. So who could this mole be?

Now a little talk about the Queen, I had a strong feeling from the start that she was not pregnant, and I was right. I also feel like she cares about the crown prince. As of now, her character seems quite mysterious and complicated to me. So I really want to see more of her story in season two in hopes of understanding her better. My radar might be wrong about her feelings towards Lee Chang, but one thing I know for sure is that she does not enjoy being controlled by her father. I feel like she might even betray him to keep her position and power intact.

Finally, I would like to discuss the cinematography for this series. It was simple, detailed and fitting to the Joseon period. The landscape shots throughout the series were breathtaking. I also noticed in episode one that the lighting indoors at night was executed perfectly. It was actually portrayed like they had only lamps and candles on set. My reason for mentioning this is because most historical kdramas tend to fail in the lighting department. They make it so evident that they are using electricity to film, but this drama was an exception, so props to the director for that. Also, the background scores really helped in creating the right effect for each scene. I believe that each instrumental piece helped the audience stay more intuned with the intensity of the show.

To wrap up my review, my rating for this series is 8.5/10. I am willing to give the remaining 1.5 points once I see the definite ending for this drama and some character depth. Overall, Kingdom was perfect. I did not find much fault with it because it was so well produced. I really hope that the second season provides answers to the few questions that remain unanswered for me. Also, I am praying that season two lives up to the hype of its predecessor. If you have not seen this TV series yet, you need to go check it out. If you have seen it, please let me know in the comment section if we share any similar opinions and what you noticed that I might have missed. That is it for this review.

I know I did not do my usual character analysis and notable scenes for this review. Here is my reason – I currently do not have enough information on each character to do that. Hopefully, by the end of the second season, I should be able to do my character analysis. As for the notable scenes, I simply could not decide. It was such a short drama, and almost every scene was essential and captivating.

To understand my rating, click 👉🏼 Drama|Movie Rating Guide

So until my next post, take everyone.